Webinar Series: Understanding Global Hazard Communication

The requirements for hazard communication, or Hazcom, in our global economy are complex and confusing.  While the Hazcom requirements are similar from country to country, each jurisdiction has its own nuances when it comes to Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and product labels.  Some countries have different requirements for consumer product classification and labelling that is not entirely in-line with the GHS classification criteria.  Additionally, there many companies receive requests for SDS for items such as articles, though articles are typically exempt from SDS regulations. All of these things make it challenging for a company to be compliant in a global marketplace.

If you are interested in gaining a better understanding of the nuances between various jurisdictions for the implementation of HazCom, Intertek is pleased to offer a complimentary webinar series.  Don’t miss the following opportunities to learn from our experts.

 

Recorded October 23, 2018

The term “Hazcom” is frequently used in the chemical world, but what does it mean? Hazard communication, or Hazcom for short, has historically been associated with the combined use of safety data sheets (SDS), labels, and training to protect the health and safety of workers when using chemicals in the workplace.  The phrase was coined in the US after the introduction of the Hazard Communication Standard in the 1980’s.  During this time, many other countries around the world were implementing similar programs with different names, such as the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) in Canada.

In recent years, Hazcom has become the global term to describe the communication of chemical hazards to users, not just within workplaces, but to consumers.  Each jurisdiction has its own name for the regulatory requirements for the protection of workers and consumers from chemical hazards, but all fall under the umbrella of hazard communication.  Information provided to protect workers and consumers is also used by transportation services, assist in the safe transport and emergency response personnel if there is a chemical emergency.

Please join us as we provide an overview of global Hazcom regulations and share our practical experiences.

 

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Recorded: November 19, 2018

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) have been in existence for several years in many jurisdictions around the world.  The introduction of the UN GHS has changed the name of this important document to Safety Data Sheet (SDS) in most jurisdictions globally, though some have retained the old name.  The SDS is intended to communicate the hazards of chemical products meeting the GHS classification criteria and provide users with important information regarding how they can protect themselves.

Companies who manufacture or import chemical products are obligated to ensure those products are properly classified and an SDS compliant for the jurisdiction of interest is provided to the down-stream user.  In many countries, the obligation to provide SDS is limited to hazardous chemical products used in workplaces; however, there is a growing trend for retail establishments to request SDS for all products, such as cosmetics, and articles, even though they may be exempt.

Please join us as we help you understand the regulated community and their obligations; discuss the content of a SDS; and share insights into how to obtain the information you need to meet the hazcom requirements.

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Recorded: December 10, 2018

In Europe, the labelling of hazardous chemical products is prescribed by the Classification, Labelling and Packaging Regulations (CLP) regardless of whether the product is used in an occupational or consumer setting.  This makes things less complicated for companies placing hazardous chemical products on the market in the EU.

In other jurisdictions, such as Canada and the United States, the requirements for the packaging and labelling of hazardous consumer chemicals follow different regulations from those prescribing the label requirements for chemicals intended for workplace use. In the US, consumer chemical classification and labelling requirements are dictated by the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA).The Consumer Chemicals and Containers Regulations (CCCR) is the legislation that prescribes the classification and labelling requirements in Canada. Both the FHSA and CCCR classification criteria are similar to the GHS criteria, though they are not completely aligned.

Failure to properly package and label consumer chemicals in the US and Canada can result in costly product recalls. Please join us as we outline the consumer product labelling requirements and help you avoid these potential market challenges.

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Recorded January 14, 2019

The term “Hazcom” is frequently used in the chemical world, but what does it mean? Hazard communication, or Hazcom for short, has historically been associated with the combined use of safety data sheets (SDS), labels, and training to protect the health and safety of workers when using chemicals in the workplace. In many countries, the obligation to provide SDS is limited to hazardous chemical products used in workplaces; however, there is a growing trend for retail establishments to request SDS for all products, such as cosmetics, and articles, even though they may be exempt.

This on-demand webinar will provide practical experiences and insight into this challenging and misunderstood area of hazcom.

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